Part of CSNPhilly.com


« Game chat: Halladay tries to put Giants in his book | Main | Lefties getting locked up. Well, most of them... »

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Comments

'Dude, whatever floats your boat.'

Word.

If Doc keeps up this pace of winning 3 of every 5 Phillies victories, the Phillies will finish 81-81 and Doc will have around 48 wins.

Sweet!!!

Again, we are lucky just to be watching this guy in the best years of his career, let alone having him carry our team on his back for the third year running.

I wonder if Doc's drop in velocity (he's off about 2 mph from last year) has anything to do with his dropoff in SO/9 (5.5 so far in 2012)

Doc is the most amazing pitcher I have ever had the priviledge to watch on a regular basis, bar none. I never thought I would be more amazed than I was by Greg Maddux back in the 90s, but I think Doc's like Maddux with a better fastball - 4 quality pitches he can throw for strikes at any time, a cutter which eats lefties alive, pinpoint control, the smartest player on the field, and totally unflappable.

Like I said, the only real difference is Halladay has a better fastball than Maddux. This makes me think Doc will be effective for much longer than a normal pitcher's lifespan, even when he loses a few MPH off his heater, he'll still have everything else going for him, which is the same stuff that made Maddux a 4 time cy young winner. I think it's quite likely Doc will reach 300 if he doesn't get hurt.

According to Bill James' favorite toy, he has about a 19% chance of getting there, despite being 34 now. Personally I think it's only the possibility of injury (something Maddux didn't really experience) which might stop him. I can see him average 17 or 18 wins over the next 3 or 4 years, and then a decline into the 13-14 range for another 4 or 5 years past that.

I wonder if Rosenthal still thinks Doc is hurt?

Rosenthal is a joke

His bad games end up with 8 IP and 2 ER.

Another factor to consider is if we are indeed in a new dead-ball era, that will greatly help pitchers in all counting stats. Fewer hits = fewer pitches = more late inning games = more wins. In other words with fewer men getting on base, a 110 pitch effort will be far more likely to get through at least the 8th inning, and give the starter a better chance of getting the W.

Another benefit of the dead ball era is since there is a lower chance of giving up an extra base hit, the pitcher has a greater incentive to throw strikes and not walk anyone (a single is usually no worse than a walk) and that will also limit pitch counts. Of course the shorter games preserve the pitchers arms as well, so it's all a very symbiotic relationship once scoring goes down.

Pedro, especially at his absolute peak in '99-'00, was definitely a notch above Halladay.

That said, like comparing pitching gods in comparing their abilities. Both are far and away better pitchers than their peers.

Pedro, especially at his absolute peak in '99-'00, was definitely a notch above...every other pitcher on earth in the history of baseball.

FTFY

It looks like Doc hasn't been located his fastball well(in comparison to his usual self, not mere mortal's location) so he's been going to a lot of offspeed stuff and taking stuff off his fastballs when he does use them.

Luckily all that stuff his filthy too, so ends up not mattering much. The next start he comes out burying his sinker/cutters for strikes right from the 1st, it might be something special.

after he stttled down he was a machine.

It's sort of amazing when you consider the best pitcher in the NL is Halladay, at age 34, and the next two guys (in my opinion, obviously this is subjective) are Kershaw and Strasburg, who are both 23.

I would rank the top pitchers in the NL right now to be Doc, Kershaw, Strasburg, Lee, Hamels. With Wainwright and Josh Johnson needing to prove they're healthy and effective to join that group.

Through age 35 season (or through current for Doc):

Maddux:

501 G, 3551 IP, .638 WP, 2.84 ERA, 145 ERA+, 3.32 K/BB, 1.117 WHIP

Doc:

381 G, 2554 IP, .675 WP, 3.21 ERA, 139 ERA+, 3.72 K/BB, 1.164 WHIP

Similar numbers, but where Maddux has the huge edge is in just raw innings pitched, because otherwsie, they are very nearly the same pitcher. Crazy stat about Maddux; from age 22 through age 40 seasons 19 seasons), he had ONE season in which he pitched less than 209 innings. He had 199.1 IP that season. Incredible.

MG, you may be right about Pedro, but it's like comparing Michelangelo with DaVinchi - how can you really say one is better than the other when both are so great? I think by the end of his career Pedro might have had the higher peak, but Halladay the better overall career in terms of length of excellence.

JW, Doc's dominance has never been taken lightly by this poster.

Career as a Phillie: 2.34 ERA, 43 - 16, .729 WP (118 win equivalent)

Team record in Doc's starts: 49 - 19, .721 WP (117 win equivalent)


After the last 2 seasons, I have to wonder what Doc's record would be had he been pitching for the Phillies, especially from 2000 - 2009 when the Jays won 805 games [.497] and the Phillies won 850 [.525].

BTW, Doc's WP during that 2000 - 2009 stint with the Jays: .668, 139 - 69.

When you look at things through that prism it's easy to see why he had the reputation of being the best pitcher in MLB before he got here. Without him Toronto would not even have been competitive.

At his peak, Pedro had no peers: not Koufax, Johnson (Walter or Randy), Gibson, Maddux, Clemens, Carlton...none. He was simply untouchable.

The only knock against him during those years was that he wasn't racking up huge IP totals, but he was over 200 IP in much of those years, so it's nitpicking.

awh, to be fair, aside form Doc's 2005 season (185 ERA+), which only comprised 19 starts, he's been a better pitcher as a Phillie than he was with the Blue Jays. I agree with your general point, though. Also, it may be that Doc has become even better as a Phillie because of the changeup he added that was shown to him by Dubee.

http://www.brooksbaseball.net/pfxVB/cache/zoneplot.php-pitchSel=all&game=gid_2012_04_16_phimlb_sfnmlb_1&sp_type=1&s_type=7.gif

Halladay did get squeezed by Foster on a few pitches lower in the strike zone but the calls he got especially on the outer part of the plate to hitters more than made up for it. In fact, some of those calls were pretty ridiculous.

Didn't understand why he was staring at Foster so much through out the game. Foster didn't call the low strike but certainly more than made up for it with the overly generous outside strike zone.

Sure most starters would give up a few borderline calls on low strikes to have an outside strike zone that generous.

Pedro's Peak (1997-2003)

199 GS, 118-36 (.766%), 1408 IP, 2.20 ERA, 213 ERA+, 1761 SO, 315 BB, 0.940 WHIP, 5.59 SO/BB

Nobody will ever equal that peak.

Fatalotti, Maddux had a much better decade in his 20s than Halladay, but in part because of his fastball and in part because he pitched so fewer innings, I think Doc will end up matching him in the end.

By the time Maddux was 35, his best years were behind him. Though still a very very good pitcher, he never posted a FIP below 3.4 after his age 35 season (after posting 12 consecutive such seasons before age 35). Though he still won almost 100 games after 35, it was his work before 35 which made him great.

I think Doc just keeps getting better, and considering Maddux started his career in a deadish ball era and pitched effectively into a very live ball era, while Halladay started in the very live ball and looks like his second half will be in a very dead ball era, I certainly think he has a good shot at overtaking MadDog.

I do wonder how Halladay would have fared though the past few years especially if he had stayed in the offensive-happy AL East. Coming to the NL & playing several seasons here definitely is going to help his overall career numbers a bit.

***Didn't understand why he was staring at Foster so much through out the game***

Because he was getting squeezed on the low pitch big time in the early innings but then got the off the plate pitches in the later innings. Before then, he wasn't getting that pitch either. It was an inconsistent zone more than anything.

NEPP - That's true. It was an a moving strike zone which did cause some of the hitters especially a few Giants' hitters to complain late in the game.

Just learned that Pat Burrell "will sign a one-day Minor League contract with Philadelphia and retire with that organization during the Phillies-Red Sox series on May 19 at Citizens Bank Park."

Nice.

DaninPhilly< is it a new "Dead Ball Era" or is it because, as has been widely reported, pitchers and pitching coaches have more info on hitters today than they ever have.

Fro instance, have you even seen the grid that breaks down the strikezone - the one they even shoe during MLB broadcasts? It shows the hitter's BA when the ball is pitched to certain areas of the zone.

Would Ted Williams have ever hit .400 if he had faced opponents who knew this:

http://www.sportsbabel.net/tedwilliams_grid.png


And this is info tha's publicly available. How much info does each team have on it's opponents, especially division rivals that they see all the time?

Maddux>>Halladay

Maddux was ridiculously dominant in the mid-90s.

awh, I have made the argument here and elsewhere many time that the information revolution is the very reason we are in a dead ball era, and why I don't think it will change any time soon.

NEPP, if Doc finished his career now, I would 100% agree with you. Throw in Doc's perfect games and no-hitters, and by the end of the day, who knows?

"At his peak, Pedro had no peers: not Koufax, Johnson (Walter or Randy), Gibson, Maddux, Clemens, Carlton...none. He was simply untouchable.

The only knock against him during those years was that he wasn't racking up huge IP totals, but he was over 200 IP in much of those years, so it's nitpicking."

that's not nitpicking - it's ignoring the very real qualitative difference that relegates Pedro to a ranking below every single one of those pitchers. Pedro was filthy and more effective at getting guys out and suppressing runs. Those other guys simply bury him in the number of outs recorded, which is the ultimate measure of a pitcher (to me).

DIP, for Doc to match Maddux's ridiculous total of 5008.1 IP, he'd have to pitch about 350 innings a year this year, and the next 6 years after that. I know there's more to a pitcher than IP totals (obviously), but IP is probably the single best counting stat, and Maddux will always have that over Doc in a big way.

***Pedro was filthy and more effective at getting guys out and suppressing runs. Those other guys simply bury him in the number of outs recorded, which is the ultimate measure of a pitcher (to me).***

Its a different era. Late 90s pitchers simply dont start 40 games a year or go 9 every night out due to the way they're managed. IF you look at it as against his peers, Pedro was so far above his peers it was ridiculous.

Fatal, you may be correct, but I think Doc can pitch effectively until he's in his early 40s, in part because of his relatively light workload in his 20s and in part because we're entering into a dead ball era. Though he might not quite reach Maddux's IP, I think he'll get pretty close.

Why would a pitcher not be annoyed if he's throwing strikes that are getting called balls? Who cares if he's getting calls off the plate? It doesn't offset the fact that he was getting squeezed and the strike zone was moving around. That was probably the most bizarre strike zone of the year so far in a Phils game.

It may be a different era and I agree that Pedro stands out more than the others when measured against their peers. But, in comparing ERAs, K/9, etc., the numbers for guys like Carlton may have looked much different if they were afforded the rest that comes with 5 man rotations and could rely upon their bullpens like Pedro.

Dan, I think we agree then.

BTW, if you go to that link and read the caption, it's actually Williams expounding on the strikezone and his ability to hit pitches in different parts of it.

It seems that he was way ahead of his peers at the time in understanding his own strengths and weaknesses.

IIRC he also did some experiments with MIT professors to find out what the single most important factor was in hitting a ball hard. What they found was that bat speed is paramount.

He was way ahead of his time.

DIP, I'd love for it to happen. In fact, if he can match a recent pitcher who did this in his age 35-42 seasons:

260 G, 1820.1 IP, 137 W, 68 L (.668), 3.06 ERA, 150 ERA+, 4.75 SO/BB, 1.075 WHIP


Randy Johnson

Iceman - It was only 2 calls though. Halladay wasn't getting the borderline strikes low but neither was Lincecum.

Agree though that it was definitely the oddest strike zone of the year. Generally won't see a zone like that.

I'm amazed that Pence made that catch and I don't recall anyone typing the word "Abreu".

Lincecum seemed to gets some high strikes that you don't usually see called that way.

BTW, in case anyone is unaware, Doc is 10th on the all-time list in winning percentage:

http://www.baseball-reference.com/leaders/win_loss_perc_career.shtml

I am not convinced that Pedro Martinez at his peak was as good or better than Sandy Koufax at his peak.

awh, I enjoyed the Ted Williams strike zone grid.

All y'alls is wrong! Nobody was better than Old Hoss Radbourn!

I am not convinced that Pedro Martinez at his peak was as good or better than Sandy Koufax at his peak.

Posted by: Lake Fred | Tuesday, April 17, 2012 at 10:56 AM

Over Koufax's best 7 year stretch, he averaged (per 162 G) 248 IP of 147 ERA+ pitching.

Over Martinez's best 7 year stretch, he averaged (per 162 G) 240 IP of 213 ERA+ pitching.

It's really not even a debate. Martinez was better.

If you want to scale down to 6 years:

Koufax: 257 IP, 156 ERA+
Martinez: 244 IP, 213 ERA+

Again, not even a debate. Martinez was better.

I wonder how dominant Koufax would have been with access to modern medicine. This is a guy that had to retire by Age 30 because he couldn't even throw between starts or lift his arm up above his head.

Halladay is a great pitcher, but IMHO he has not shown himself to be as good as Maddux yet. Perhaps he has in in him this year and the next. If you look at their peak years in ERA+ and WHIP, it's clear that Doc has some work to do to get to Maddux's level.

It was really nice to see the Phillies strike Lincecum early while he was struggling, stringing together hits, capitalizing on opportunity.

It's great to have Doc on the mound, too, having confidence that he'll limit damage to a few runs and take you deep into the game.

And then to have Papelbon come in and shut it down.

Finally, the Phillies' defense is dependable, too. Which is always a plus, although it's easy to take it for granted.

on Pedro vs. Koufax: Fatalotti's stats shows the difference between similar numbers between Dodger Stadium and the NL in the 60's and Fenway during the juice era in the AL (with the DH).

I couldn't stay awake last night and missed Polly getting hit on the elbow, but the news makes me groan. It's not as though he was lighting the world on fire, but if he has an injured elbow, AGAIN, I'd expect his output to be diminished by it as has seemed to be the case in the past.

Found this by Dave Murphy:
* * *
Since 2007, Polanco's slugging percentage has dropped from .458 to .417 to .396 to .386 in his first season with the Phillies to .339 in 2011.

The Phillies certainly expect to see more power out of Jimmy Rollins and Shane Victorino, who entered last night having combined for two extra base hits in 78 plate appearances.

Freddy Galvis' double last night gave him the team lead with four extra base hits. Carlos Ruiz and Hunter Pence are tied at second with three apiece.

http://scores.espn.go.com/mlb/preview?gameId=320417126

AccuScore has the Giants' winning 66% of the stimulated 10k games they ran for tonight matchup?

Guess they don't think much of Kentucky Joe.

"Freddy Galvis' double last night gave him the team lead with four extra base hits."

GBrettFan, say that sentence again. It seems unreal that Galvis should be leading the team in extra base hits, even after just 10 games. Galvis!!!!

GBrettfan - It literally is next to impossible for Polanco's SLG pct to drop any lower. His total last year ranked 140 out of 145 qualified players. Funny in that Pierre was ranked 144th.

It kills this lineup when they trot out Pierre/Polanco in the 1-2 spot. Absolutely hate that lineup. Polanco is good defensively but Pierre isn't & has lost speed.

Worst thing about Pierre making this roster is that he was guaranteed to get a ton of PT in LF and the leadoff spot. Two poor choices by Cholly.

I would rather see Cholly start Nix/Mayberry/Wigginton most of the time at 1B/LF and use Pierre sparingly.

Won't happen though.

MG, the worst thing about Pierre getting all that PT in LF is that it must mean that Mayberry isn't out there being productive, because if he were, there'd be no reason to play Pierre at all, since Pierre can do nothing that Mayberry can't also do.

The Phils need Mayberry to be a productive LF, or this offense will struggle.

Anyone else want to see this happen:

Utley comes back just in time for Palanco to go on the D/L. Jimmy slides over to 3rd and Galvis takes SS. Brown gets called up to patrol LF (OK, to hit and hope he doesn't trip over himself in LF). He and Mayberry platoon for a while.

Howard gets the call a month later and Mayberry platoons with him as he gets his legs under him again. At that time, Brown is a full timer and once Howard is playing every day Mayberry becomes a great 4th outfielder.

A man can dream.

"Worst thing about Pierre making this roster is that he was guaranteed to get a ton of PT in LF and the leadoff spot. Two poor choices by Cholly."

Not to mention poor choice No. 3: starting Pierre against the very types of pitchers whom he can't hit at all, and never, ever starting him against the very types of pitchers whom he kills. It's like acquiring Laynce Nix, and only using him against LHP. It is so mind-bogglingly brain dead that I haven't words to describe it -- unless you consider "mind-bogglingly brain dead" to be sufficient.

Free Nix!

Given the current state of this pop-gun offense, this is no reason that Nix shouldn't be in the lineup everyday vs. RHP either at 1B/LF.

Here are his split vs. RHP the last 3 years:

.263/.312/.480 with 35 HRs in 723 ABs with a 6.7% BB rate. That's a HR though every 20.7 ABs. Also had 46 doubles.

Desperately need that kind of XBH power. He either should be at 1B/LF almost everyday.

Doesn't have the experience at 1B but he certainly has more range than Wigginton. In LF, he is a defensive upgrade over the below-average Pierre.

For the time-being, I wouldn't mind vs LHP starters I would like to see Pierre in LF and Mayberry at 1B and with some combo of Nix/Mayberry in LF and Nix/Wigginton at 1B but with Nix in the lineup vs RHP starters.

Free Nix Cholly! Free Nix!

They've played 10 games. Pierre has started in 5 of them. When Pierre plays his way out of his PT role, he'll be a PR type. Right now, he's started half the games and is batting around .300.

OK, who on the board predicted this?:


"Freddy Galvis' double last night gave him the team lead with four extra base hits. Carlos Ruiz and Hunter Pence are tied at second with three apiece."


Freddy? That's all you need to know, descrriptively, about what the Phils offense has done so far.

"I would rather see Cholly start Nix/Mayberry/Wigginton most of the time at 1B/LF and use Pierre sparingly."


MG, I agree. Does "sparingly" mean you'd use Pierre as a pinch runner? :)

Freddy has done everything that's expected/hoped for him and more. If anything, he is playing over his head right now.

Of course, with all the emphasis on Pierre's lefty-righty splits, it's probably worth noting the following numbers, which are among the most incredible I've ever seen:

Last year, Juan Pierre had 146 ABs against LHP. He had exactly 1 extra base hit -- a double.

Over the last 2 seasons, Pierre has had 304 ABs against LHP. Over those 304 ABs, he has had 3 extra base hits -- all doubles.

Over the last 4 seasons, Pierre has had 511 ABs against LHP. Over those 511 ABs, he has had 8 extra base hits -- 3 doubles and 2 triples.

He does get on base, though.

"When Pierre plays his way out of his PT role, he'll be a PR type."

You have far more faith than I do in Cholly's ability to relegate a veteran player to a full-time bench role, due to non-performance.

"The Phils need Mayberry to be a productive LF, or this offense will struggle."


Fatti, I've posted to that effect since November.

If Mayberry starts hitting this offense will score.

I'd run this lineup out there tonight:

Jimmy (I HATE him in the 3-hole: .257/.318/.337, 347 PA)
Mayberry
Vic
Pence
Wiggy
Chooch
Freddy
Polly
P

BAP - Geoff Jenkins was making far more than Pierre is now and had a better history of play.

Has Galvis gotten any cheap hits yet? I can't recall him hitting one off a base or blooping one to no man's land so far.

***BAP - Geoff Jenkins was making far more than Pierre is now and had a better history of play. ***

And it only took 4 short months for him to be relegated to the bench.

NEPP - Jenkins was hitting .286/.330/.452 in June of 2008. There was no reason to bench him at that time.

I do feel for Cholly right now because Polanco/Mayberry aren't hitting at all and Mayberry's been in the same funk since this spring.

If those 2 guys don't hit, there isn't much of anything Cholly can do to order the lineup to get much offense.

Vic in the 3-hole:

.303/.351/.424, but only 37 PA.


I'd give him a chance and move Jimmy elsewhere.

NEPP - I think there are two factors, possibly related, that diminish Koufax' greatness. First, because of the rules then in effect regarding bonus babies like Koufax, he was pitching in the majors before he was ready, and the early part of his career was not very good. Second, as you said, his career ended much too soon because of injury.

Before Pedro came along, I thought Koufax' last four seasons was as good a stretch as anybody else's. There are a few others, though, who had terrific stretches, guys like Mathewson, Grove and Maddux.

Fatti - If IP is what impresses you most, you must love Cy Young (7,356 IP).

Off topic, but can't you see the TV commercials now, in your mind's eye?

“I'm just looking at trucks,” he (Charlie Manuel) said with a laugh. “If we win some games, I might buy a dealership."

Zolecki says "Plooy's Elbow Is OK":

http://zozone.mlblogs.com/

Jenkins and playing-time.

Opening day to June 6:

Phils played 63 games
Jenkins started 41 of those games hitting .286/.330/.452

From that day to August 7
Phils played 51 games
Jenkins started 27 of those games hitting .165/.255/.299

He then started in just 6 of the teams final 21 games.

Despite his contract, career, and a relatively solid start to the season, Jenkins played his way out of a PT role in ~50 games. When/If a better option presents itself, it will take CM far less than 50 games with Pierre.

"Polly's" elbow

Sophist: Yeah, it happened with Jenkins, even if it took way too long. It also happened with Moyer, although RAJ essentially forced it on Cholly by signing Pedro. But there's also precedent for Cholly sticking with the veteran player through the entire season, even while he continues to stink it up -- i.e., Ibanez (2011) and Lidge (2009).

Why can't we move Jimmy back to leadoff? He's hitting well, but all singles. Good for setting the table, and we know he can run the bases well. I don't know who should bat second, because I'm not feeling it with Polly right now, but Vic batting third sounds good to me.

BAP - It just seems silly to me to compare Pierre to Lidge or even Ibanez. CM is still trying to figure out what kind of team he has, and Pierre happens to be hitting an empty .300. It's not the lineup I'd trot out there, but from the way it's talked about you'd think he's guaranteeing Pierre 100 starts. He's started 5 games and hit okay. He's making no money. The team has no obligation to this guy. When he shows his true colors and something better presents itself, he'll be gone.

Sophist, one bit of info you're leaving out with regard to Jenkins is this:

.264/.353/.494

is where Werth sat on June 30, 2008, and he did this

.279/.371/.500

the rest of the season.

Cholly had a viable alternative with whom to replace Jenkins, and he did not let Charlie down.

GBrett: The exact same thing happened last year. Early in the year, we were batting Rollins 3rd and, while his OBP soared, he couldn't drive in a run to save his life. Hence, we moved him back to the leadoff spot, where his newly-found on-base skills immediately disappeared and he once again began swinging for the fences.

The most ironic part of Pierre's lefty heavy reverse splits was when Mayberry (who is in a deep funk) was called upon to hit for JP against a lefty late last night (then stayed in for defensive purposes, which I'm fine with).

Basically, Manuel won't ever get over the whole "lefty pitcher = righty batter" mentality, regardless of historical performance. That said, JP was having a terrible offensive night, so it wasn't really a big deal.

BTW, after watching Aubrey Huff patrolling LF last night, I'm further in the camp of "how much harm can he possibly do?" regarding Brown on defense.

BAP - The other point I'm making is that people are complaining about something that hasn't even happened yet. Maybe Pierre won't be gone, but from the way it's talked about you'd think his continued presence is a foregone conclusion.

Just the strange neurosis some in the fan base have taken to: trying to discover all the ways for thing to go wrong and fall apart at any sign of trouble instead of just enjoying something for what it is. Look to see how much some struggled to enjoy a 102 win season as perfect evidence.

awh - I didn't leave that out at all. I said "When he shows his true colors and something better presents itself, he'll be gone."

If Nix and Mayberry continue to struggle, then yeah Pierre will still get PT even if he stops hitting.

Its always interesting to watch JP crush one off the bat...and see it loft mightily all the way to the back of the infield dirt if he got all of it. I dont think I've ever seen a guy with less power than him.

Galvis, a supposed light bat, is like Hank Aaron next to JP.

WP, Brown has a .738 OPS at LV right now.

That's not exactly tearing it up.

They probably want to see him get hot, and much may depend on his improvement in LF.

Galvis hits the ball pretty hard from the left side. The quality of his contact from that side surprised me. From the right side, not so much.

NEPP, I think the same thing every time. No matter how much he squares one up and turns on one, the best you're going to get is a soft liner that one hops the CF.

If Pierre hits one so much as over the head of an OF this season, I'll be shocked.

Turns out that anonymous scout was wrong. It's actually, "Aside from Halladay, they're not very good."

I can honestly say I've never watched a pitcher quite like Doc. The man is an alchemist on the mound. Definitely one of those rare players who is worth the price of admission all by his lonesome.

awh, I'm not too much concerned about Brown's offense right now (he still leads LV in RBI).

I truly do believe that he's been concentrating on the defense, and the offense may have slipped just a bit. He's shown, even at the big league level for a little bit, that he can hit. That's not a concern of mine at all. Especially when the alternative is Juan Pierre's mighty offensive comp.

Brown had a slow start in LV. He's hit safely in his last 6 games. 9-25 with 4 XBH and a .385 OBP.

Willard brings up a decent point w/r/t Huff, but I wonder if Pagan's poor play and positioning in the first had anything to do with having Huff out in LF.

"That's one of his main elbows."

-Charlie Manuel, on Polanco's HBP

Everyone's favorite alternative to Pierre is 3 for 19 and an OPS of .462 and an error. Pods hasn't really started off well at AAA. Still lots of time to turn it around though.

That's a big part of what is so great about Doc - he could easily go all Kenny Powers on us, but instead, he stays humble saying there he has room for improvement.

Yikes. Hector Luna has 4 errors already?

I think Charlie put in Mayberry to bat more to try to get Mayberry an AB to maybe get something positive going rather than just to match up. ML managers do sometimes make moves based on things other than the game in front of him.

I'm with Sophist on Pierre. Pretty straightforward, common sense. Everybody relax a little.

"The other point I'm making is that people are complaining about something that hasn't even happened yet."

I disagree. He has already made 5 starts against RHP. That's 5 more starts than he should have made all season. In 3 of those 5 games, he started while Nix sat. Our record in those games is 1-2. In fairness to Pierre, he had 2 hits and 2 RBIs in one of those losses. But my point stands. Nix should almost always be in the lineup against RHP; Pierre should almost never be.

The comments to this entry are closed.

EST. 2005

Top Stories

HardballTalk

Rotoworld News

Follow on Twitter

Follow on Facebook

Contact Weitzel

CSG