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Tuesday, November 29, 2005

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Do a quick and dirty analysis of where closers on their current teams have come from. I think you will be surprised. I personally would follow more of the Beane approach, but thats assuming we had minor league talent.

A look around the league at the good young relievers, you see a lot of them became relievers around Double A. The phillies don't tend to make the transition there, instead preferring to do it in Spring Training or in-season as a way of keeping effective (or not-so-effective) young pitchers on the squad (see C. Silva, R. Madson, E. Ramirez, R. Tejada, and eeeek, G. Floyd). They don't seem to buy into developing a pitcher as a reliever or even in letting them transition to be a reliever at some point in their development, instead going with the more-innings is better philosophy.

For instance, why is K. Bucktrot not in the pen? They say he blows 95mph cheese, but he clearly can't get hitters out consistently. I'd venture that's due to poor secondary pitches. Yet, how many power relievers have the Braves thrown at the phillies who only had 1 1/2 pitches? Fact is, for 1 inning, you only need 1 1/2 pitches to get by. Don't know if it's philosophy or what, but I think it might be wise to develop certain raw power pithers specifically as relievers rather than force feed them as starters.

I don't have the stats to back this notion up, but I suspect the top young relievers coming into the game, like a Chad Cordero, were closers in college, not just the minors. In other words, they were drafted as closers.

Philliesopher :
Somewhere along the way, "mental makeup" pushed "electric cheese" off the podium for what's valued most in a closer.

Pass the chedder. Give me an inning of pitches that can't be hit. It's part of the problem I have with fans who would rather .... ahem .... "swear alegence to the Royals" than test Padilla in a reliever role. Padilla's fastball might be the most feared pitch in the organization.

As for Bucktrot, absolutely. That's a 91-93 mph sinker he throws, and the time has come to move him to the pen.

Is this an Arbuckle thing? I mean in terms of not developing/drafting closers.

Geez, I wrote almost the exact same thing earlier today before I read this -- how come we haven't developed a closer since (shudder) Ricky Bottalico?

I would love to see the Phils move Bucktrot to the pen. The FA market for relievers is crazy!

"Pass the chedder. Give me an inning of pitches that can't be hit. It's part of the problem I have with fans who would rather .... ahem .... "swear alegence to the Royals" than test Padilla in a reliever role. Padilla's fastball might be the most feared pitch in the organization."

Uh, who are you referring to Jason?

Kyle Farnsworth brings some serious gas, but he has never done very well until this year, and even then he blew up in the playoffs. I do agree with you though, Padilla's fastball is not only fast but it dances.

I think they need to follow the example of some of these other teams that plug pitchers into the role instead of just hoping there is a closer out there with 200+career saves. I like Tejeda for the role. He's got good velocity, and a live ball.

All that said, I am glad Wagner is gone. His crappy attitude and ill-timed rants had run their course. Plus, I won't forgive him for grooving that pitch to Biggio when it mattered most. I don't care how many days in a row he pitched.

Oh yeah, and his playoff numbers suck.

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